Cowdenbeath No. 10 (Kirkford) Pit

Owners: Fife Coal Co. Ltd.
NCB

The Cowdenbeath No. 10, or Kirkford Pit, was sunk by the newly amalgamated Cowdenbeath Coal Co. and Fife Coal Co. in 1896/98. The shaft was situated near the old North Road, at the Crosskeys Junction, to the west of Cowdenbeath and south of Leuchatsbeath.

See entry Cowdenbeath Pits and Mines for a summary of mining activity in the area.
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It was sunk to the Dunfermline Splint lying at 236 fathoms (the deepest shaft in the area at that time) and connecting roads were quickly driven to Dalbeath, Mossbeath, Lindsay and Cowdenbeath No. 7 collieries.
A day level, 1400 yds. long in the Lochgelly Splint, was established to drain water from No. 7 and the pit was connected to the main railway line by an extension to the mineral line from No 7.
The 16 ft. diameter winding-drum was driven by steam engines, and each wind of 40 seconds raised 2 tons of coal in 4 hutches. Output was in the region of 1000 tons per day. Ram pumps in the pit bottom were operated by steel pump rods placed in the shaft, and which were raised and lowered by steam engines on the surface. The pumps were capable of raising 1300 gallons of water per minute.
The Kirkford ceased production temporarily, in 1928, under the Scottish Marketing Scheme for restriction of output but did not re-open as a production unit. No. 10 became, and remained, a pumping, ventilation and access shaft for No. 7.

Pit opened: 1896/98 Pit closed: Coal seams abandoned
before 1928 but this pit was maintained
for pumping and ventilation
Source Date of Information Supplied
Manager / Under-Manager / Men underground / Men above ground / Coal seams worked
1896 (Fife Coal Company Ltd.)
Henry Rowan / ------------ / 24/ 25
Sinking.
1900
Henry Rowan, Manager;  John Hunter, Underground Manager.
1901
William Brown, Manager; John Hunter, Underground Manager.
1902
W. E. Richardson / John Hunter / 417 / 43
As Cowdenbeath No. 7 & No. 10
Gas, household, manufacturing and steam coals.
1904
W. E. Richardson / John Hunter / 404 / 68
Gas, household, manufacturing and steam coals.
August: John Hunter, under-manager, leaves for Lumphinnans No. 11.
1905
W. E. Richardson / ------------ / 360 / 56
December: Mr Richardson, manager, leaves to join Mossbeath Colliery.
1906
David Farquharson, Manager.
1908
James Gavin, Jr. / ------------ / 532 / 97
1909
June: Mr Robert Crawford, ex-Mauricewood, appointed manager.
As Cowdenbeath No. 7 & Kirkford
1911
Mr Robert Crawford / ------------ / 587 / 121
As Cowdenbeath No. 7 and Kirkford
1912
Oct: Mr Robert Crawford, manager, promoted to Dunnikier Colliery.
Mr George S. Christie (ex-Benarty Colliery), appointed new manager.
1913 (Fife Coal Co.)
Mr George S. Christie, manager.
Nov: Mr John Spence, assistant manager, appointed manager at Mossbeath Colliery.
1914 (Fife Coal Co.)
Mr George S. Christie, manager.
July: Mr James Dempster, under-manager.
1918
George S. Christie / John J. Alexander / 347 / 147
As Cowdenbeath No. 7 and No. 10 (Kirkford)
1920
---------- / John J. Alexander / 414 / 179
As Cowdenbeath No. 7 and No. 10 (Kirkford)
1921/22
Robert Gillespie / J. J. Alexander / --- / ---
As No. 7 & No. 10 (Kirkford)
July, 1922: Robert Gillespie appointed to succeed Mr W. C. Bridgewood as agent for the F.C.C. at Leven.
August: Mr John Jack Alexander, oversman at No. 7, appointed manager.
August: Mr Andrew Scott, oversman, transferred to post at Aitken Pit.
1927
Mr J. J. Alexander, manager.
September: Mr Alexander to be appointed manager at No. 1 Pit, Lumphinnans Colliery.
New manager appointed - Mr Crawford, No. 7 Pit and Kirkford.
1938
H. Black / Wm. Huggins / 402 / 115 / (manpower figures mainly for Cowdenbeath No. 7 Pit)
As No. 7 and Kirkford.
1945
J. Bennet / Andrew Mackenzie / 403 / 153 (manpower figures mainly for Cowdenbeath No. 7 Pit)
Cowdenbeath No. 7 continued to work coal with No. 10 used for pumping and ventilation
1947 (NCB)
J. Eadie / Andrew Mackenzie / 368 / 78 (manpower figures mainly for Cowdenbeath No. 7)
Gas, household and industrial coals. Approx. annual output = 163,300 tons
1948 (NCB)
J. Eadie / Andrew Mackenzie / 362 / 92 (manpower figures mainly for Cowdenbeath No. 7)
Cowdenbeath No. 7 continued to work coal with No. 10 used for pumping and ventilation


Information on coals worked at Cowdenbeath No. 10 (Kirkford) Pit

(based on reports from 1930 and 1934)

The Dunfermline Splint Coal lay 233 fathoms from the surface and measured 4 ft. 9 in.
The Two Foot Coal lay 7 or 8 fathoms above the Splint seam and measured 2 ft. thick.
Five Foot Coal was 5 ft. 9 in. and Jewel Coal was found as two 1 ft. 6 in. leaves of coal separated by about 15 ft. of fireclay.
The Mynheer Coal seam was also in two leaves, an upper 21 in. coal being separated from a lower 24 in. coal by 4 fathoms of sandy layers.
The Glassee Coal was cut in the shaft 195 fathoms from the surface and was 6 ft. 9 in. thick.
Lochgelly Splint and Parrot Coals were worked from a single seam from 9 ft. to 13 ft. thick.
The Jersey Coals lay some 4 fathoms above the Swallowdrum Coal. An upper 3 ft. coal was separated from a lower 2 ft. 6 in. coal by 14 in. blaes.
Only 2 ft. 4 in. of Fourteen Foot Coal was cut in this shaft. Here also 1 ft. 4 in. of Rough Coal was recorded in two ribs.
The Little Splint seam was from 2 ft. 6 in. to 3 ft. thick and rested on a thin fireclay underlain by sandstone.
Cardenden Smithy Coal in two leaves of 2 ft. 11 in. and 1 ft. 10 in. was cut at 97 fathoms and the Bowesbank Coal lay 6 to 20 fathoms above the Index Limestone of the Upper Limestone Group and was variable in thickness and in quality.
In the Cowdenbeath-Lochore syncline, where it rested on a thin bed of fireclay and overlain by fakes or faky blaes, the coal generally exceeded 2 ft. and may have reached 3 ft. 9 in. It was variously described in bores as "foul coal", "parrot coal" and "splint coal". At Kirkford Pit, the seam was in two leaves: an upper leaf of 8 in. and a lower leaf of 10 in. resting on coaly blaes.


Plans of Abandoned Seams & Dates

Abandonment dates for seams may relate to the complete closure of a colliery but, abandonment plans and dates must also be provided for a seam which has not been worked for a period of 12 months. It was quite normal, therefore, for some 'abandoned' coal seams to be re-opened for working at a later date or at a different location.


Plans of Abandoned Seams for Cowdenbeath No. 10 (Kirkford) Pits or Mines designated in Plans
COAL; Main or Fourteen Feet; Diamond; Glassee; Mynheer; Jewel; Two Feet (August, 1927); Five Feet (December, 1927) COWDENBEATH
No. 7, Kirkford No. 10, Mossbeath No. 1
COAL; Dunfermline Splint (January, 1921); Lochgelly Splint (October, 1922) COWDENBEATH
Kirkford No. 10

A Personal Note

"The pit baths at Kirkford serviced the miners of No. 7 and Kirkford was also the main lamp station where most of the head lamps were charged up. A much smaller lamp-charging station existed at the No. 7 but this was mostly used by the firemen, the under-manager and manager.
The Kirkford also possessed a workshop specialising in maintaining its role as a pumping station. Most of the mechanical work, such as fitting and pouring bearings with babbit, was done up there by an engineer named Davie Beveridge, from Halbeath, who, according to what I was told, must have spent his whole working career at that pumping station! The winding engine room at Kirkford was apparently a delight to see because they kept up regular painting, just like the Forth Rail Bridge - an endless job - as they went over and over painting and cleaning!
I was told by an old miner of an accident that happened at this pit, in 1907, as a team of four men were clearing up after a roof fall. There was another fall that buried the men and a young lad of 18 years managed to pull himself clear but the fall had put out his light so, in total darkness, he managed to make his way to the pit-bottom to get help for his workmates. He became a hero but only a few days after the accident he collapsed and died."

M. Martin, Author.

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A Few Notes on the Early Days

by
CHARLES AUGUSTUS CARLOW

1887:  In this year the Company purchased Hill of Beath Collieries and lands, and acquired the lease of Dalbeath.
Mr. Henry Rowan came at that time to the Company, to manage this part of the undertaking. Mr. Rowan also was in charge of the sinking of Kirkford, Cowdenbeath No. 10, which at the time was an immense task, very successfully accomplished. Everybody who knew Mr. Rowan liked him, and the friendship between us was fast and firm. It is interesting to note that a grandson of Mr. Rowan, in the person of Mr. Henry King, now occupies an important position with the Company and lives at Foulford House, Cowdenbeath, which the Company originally bought as a residence for Mr. Rowan.

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"Dunfermline Saturday Press"
13 August, 1892
THE COWDENBEATH COAL COMPANY, LIMITED

The Cowdenbeath and Lumphinnans Collieries are henceforth to be carried on by the New Company known as - The Cowdenbeath Coal Company, Limited. As referred last week, these works were thrown in the market to the public to be taken up by £10 shares, with the result that by Friday when the share list closed, the money was offered four times over. Moneyed men were rushing after shares from all parts of the country, thinking no doubt that they could invest their capital and derive a profit such as the old Company realised for the past three years.

The old Company announced in their prospectus that their average profit for the last three years was £45,825, 8s., and as so many would-be shareholders have come forward, many of them must be rejected. The new Company are to begin shortly to sink shafts on the Moss-side ground, a little to the west of Cowdenbeath, and on the north side of the burgh. A new field is to be opened up, known as Leuchatsbeath. Proving and experimenting on these places is to be gone into, and should they turn out favourable, the district will be in course of time one of the busiest coal centres in the county.

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"Dunfermline Saturday Press"
24 October, 1896

John Toole, mining contractor, Cowdenbeath, met with an accident on Tuesday at the pit which is being sunk at Craigford (Kirkford) by the Fife Coal Company. Toole was working along with another man at the bottom of the shaft which is 82 fathoms in depth. When the kettle, which was at the time off plumb, was about to be raised, the rope tightened and came into contact with one of the wooden planks forming a scaffold five fathoms from the bottom of the shaft. The plank fell down the shaft, and striking Toole on the left arm fractured that limb between the elbow and wrist. Dr Thomson attended to the injured man.

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"Dunfermline Saturday Press"
12 December, 1896

An accident which occurred on Friday last in the pit which is being sunk by the Fife Coal Company at Kirkford, Cowdenbeath, has had a fatal result. A number of men were working at the bottom of the shaft when a noise was heard above, and they took up positions close to the wall. One of them, however, Thomas Carolan (27), Lumphinnans, was struck on the head by a piece of wood, and so severely injured that he died within twelve hours thereafter.

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"Dunfermline Saturday Press"
16 January, 1897

The Fatal Accident Inquiry into the death of Thomas Carolan, pit sinker, Lumphinnans, who was fatally injured on 4th December 1896, in the Fife Coal Company's pit at Kirkford, was held in Dunfermline Sheriff Court on the 15th January, 1897.

... The Jury found that while at work at the bottom of the pit shaft, deceased was struck by a piece of wood falling down the shaft, and died the same day at the house of Mrs Ferris, 23 Lumphinnans. The evidence failed to establish where the plank had fallen from; but the supposition was, that it had been used as a temporary scaffold at some point in the shaft.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
3 March, 1897

... Yesterday Wm. Martin was injured in the sinking pit at Kirkford.

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"Dunfermline Press"
11 December, 1897

While George Smith, pit sinker, High Street, Cowdenbeath, was working on a scaffold about ten fathoms from the bottom of the Crawford [Kirkford?] Pit, on Wednesday, he slipped, and fell to the bottom of the shaft. On being conveyed home, Smith was attended to by Dr Craig, who found him to be suffering from severe internal injuries.

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"Dunfermline Press"
5 March, 1898

Kirkford Pit, which has been sunk by the Fife Coal Company on their Cowdenbeath coalfield, is likely to turn out one of the best they have sunk. It is expected that upwards of 600 tons output daily will be obtained. A considerable number of workmen's cottages are to be erected in the locality.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
9 March, 1898

The operations at the large new pit at Kirkford, belonging to the Fife Coal Coy., have so far advanced, that all the erections on the pit head have been completed, and at the beginning of the week a start was made for mineral, and on Tuesday, coals for the first time ascended the shaft. As the minerals are developed, employment will be found for the increased numbers of men. The output is expected to be a large one.

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 August, 1898

On Monday, a young man named William Anderson, residing at High Street, while engaged in Kirkford Pit, was severely bruised by a large stone which fell from the roof.

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 September, 1898
DUNDEE INSTITUTE OF ENGINEERS
VISIT COWDENBEATH PITS

On Saturday the members of Dundee Institute of Engineers visited Foulford, Mossbeath, and Kirkford Collieries at Cowdenbeath. The party were met by Mr Anderson, the manager, and Messrs Rennie and Christie, and were courteously conducted by them through the different collieries. ... The party thereafter proceeded to Kirkford Pit, which was only sunk to its depth this year. The surface arrangements are at present in process of erection, but the pumping plant at this pit quite supersedes those of the other collieries.
The visit, which was most enjoyable, concluded with votes of thanks to the Fife Coal Company for their kindness, after which the visitors were entertained at lunch by the Company.

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"Dunfermline Press"
4 February, 1899

John Cree, miner, Hill of Beath, met with his death on Monday morning in the underground workings of the No. 10 Pit, Kirkford, Fife Coal Company. The deceased was engaged in the splint dook filling coals at the face, when a quantity of stones weighing seven or eight tons came away from the roof. Another miner, named James Reid, was working along with Cree. He heard the crash coming and got out of the way, after giving a warning to Cree, who, however, was unable to make good his escape, and was buried underneath the stones. It took fully an hour to remove the debris and get the body out. Death must have been almost instantaneous. The body was afterwards examined by Dr W. R. Nasmyth, Crossgates. The deceased was forty-three years of age. He was married, and leaves a widow but no family. He only went to Kirkford a fortnight ago from Torryburn, where he was previously working. He was a native of Crossgates.

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"Dunfermline Press"
18 February, 1899

This issue carried the Fatal Accident Report relative to the death of John Cree, miner, Main Street, Hill of Beath. Those giving evidence at the inquiry, which was held in Dunfermline Sheriff Court yesterday, included:- Henry Rowan, colliery manager; James Reid, West Row, Hill of Beath; William Press, pit-inspector, Frosty Mountains; John Hunter, oversman, Kirkford. The verdict returned was simply to the effect that deceased was killed on the spot by a fall from the roof under which he was working.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 April, 1899

John Slora, proprietor of a shooting gallery at Cowdenbeath, and employed as a coal trimmer at Kirkford Pit, met with a distressing accident on Tuesday. He was knocked down by a train of empty waggons, and the wheels of thirteen of the waggons passed over his legs. He was attended to by Dr Christie, Cowdenbeath, who temporarily dressed the injured limbs, and ordered the man's removal to the Dunfermline Cottage Hospital. It was there found necessary to amputate the right leg at the knee, and also to amputate the left foot.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 May, 1899

The pumping machinery at No. 7 Pit, Cowdenbeath Colliery, broke down on Friday last, and as this pit reaches the bottom of the coalfield of the district, extensive flooding was caused. The water rose to such an extent that it closed the air course in connection with the large new pit at Kirkford. The result was an entire stoppage of work at both pits, and 300 men have been idle during the week, although the machinery was repaired on Monday and pumping has been going on continuously since. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 January, 1900

Thomas Ross (67), miner, Hill of Beath, sustained a serious accident on Thursday whilst employed at his usual occupation in No. 10 Pit, Kirkford, Hill of Beath [sic] Colliery. He was working at the coal face when a stone weighing about 3 cwts. Fell from the roof, knocked him down, and severely injured him internally. He was conveyed home and attended to by Dr Nasmyth.

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 February, 1900

The Kirkford Pit, which has been sunk at Kirkford, near Cowdenbeath, by the Fife Coal Company, has now been sunk to the Dunfermline splint, a distance of 236 fathoms. The pit is one of the deepest in Scotland.

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"Dunfermline Press"
31 March, 1900

An explosion of gas, fortunately unattended by very serious results, occurred on Monday morning in the underground workings of No. 10 Pit, Kirkford, Cowdenbeath.
Daniel McGuire, mining contractor, Cowdenbeath, and Michael Roley, miner, Hill of Beath, were proceeding to their working place in the Dunfermline Splint dook when the explosion occurred. It is understood that the underground inspector had previously detected a small quantity of gas. As the result of the explosion both McGuire and Roley were severely burned about the face, neck, and arms. The two men were conveyed home. McGuire was attended to by Dr Craig, and Roley by Dr Nasmyth. Roley was afterwards removed to the Dunfermline Cottage Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
14 April, 1900

Robert Durie, miner, Hill of Beath, sustained a fracture of his collar bone through a quantity of coal falling upon him on Monday while he was at work in the underground workings of No. 10 Pit, Cowdenbeath Colliery.

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"Dunfermline Press"
21 April, 1900

A young man named John McLisker, Cowdenbeath, was somewhat severely hurt on Monday in Kirkford Pit by a quantity of coal falling upon him.

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"Dunfermline Press"
28 April, 1900

Another fatality falls to be added to the list of accidents which have occurred in this district within the last few weeks. On Monday morning, an accident happened in the Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath Colliery of the Fife Coal Company, by which one man was killed and another injured. Two road repairers, named James McCue and Wm. Stewart, both residing at Foulford Street, Cowdenbeath, had been engaged in the pit during the night brushing the roads. After clearing away a fall they were removing a hutch which had gone off the rails when the hutch came in contact with one of the props supporting the roof. The prop broke, and a large stone in the roof fell upon the two men. McCue was completely buried by the stone. Stewart had been struck on the head, and was stunned for a time, but, on coming to himself, was able to go for assistance. On McCue being extricated it was found that the unfortunate man was quite dead. Deceased was thirty-two years of age.

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"Dunfermline Press"
5 May, 1900
PIT ACCIDENT AT COWDENBEATH
MAN AND BOY KILLED

On Tuesday night, an accident occurred in the Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath, belonging to the Fife Coal Company, by which a man and a boy were killed.
Andrew Brown (32), Foulford Road, Cowdenbeath, and Thomas Glenny (15), drawer, Hill of Beath, were engaged at the coal face in the five feet seam, when a stone weighing 3 cwts. Suddenly burst from the roof and fell upon them. On the stone being removed it was found that Glenny's neck had been broken, and that life was extinct, while Brown was so seriously injured that he succumbed to his injuries within a few hours after his removal home. Brown was married and leaves a widow. Four deaths have been caused within a few weeks by accidents in the Kirkford Pit, and the number of accidents at the Fife pits generally has been unusually large of late.

Also present was the Report on the Fatal Accident Inquiry into the death of James McCue, roadsman, killed at Kirkford Pit on 23 April. Those giving evidence included: Henry Rowan, colliery manager; John Hunter, under-ground manager; William Stewart, brusher; and, John McGill, oversman, Foulford Place. The jury found that the deceased was instantaneously killed by a stone falling from the roof.

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"The Scotsman"
5 May, 1900

DISCLOSURES AT A FATAL ACCIDENT INQUIRY. - In connection with a public inquiry held at Dunfermline yesterday some remarkable disclosures were made. The inquiry was with reference to the death of Michael Rowley, miner, Hall Row, Hill of Beath, who was on 26th March so severely burned by an explosion of gas in the Fife Coal Company's No. 10 Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath, that he died on 9th April. Henry Rowan, colliery manager, stated that up to the time of the accident he had not heard of gas being found in the place at which Rowley and others were working, although there had been indications of gas "singing" from the face. There was a "trouble" near, and that was a likely place in which gas would be found. When he examined the place after the accident he did not see a fireman's chalk mark to indicate that the place had been inspected. Robert Gillies, Greenhill, Lanarkshire, said that he was one of the firemen employed in the pit on 26th March. About half-past five o'clock in the morning he made an inspection of the place at which Rowley and Daniel McGuire were working. There was a little gas, or what he understood to be gas. He told Rowley and McGuire that there was a little gas, but that he did not think there was much. He did not tell them that they were not to go in. He gave McGuire a Davy lamp. He had no reason to think that the gas would be away before the men went in. Up to the time of the accident he had been only three weeks a fireman. He knew that there were special rules to be observed in the pit, but he never read them. He was not aware of the rule that after making an inspection he should mark with chalk the day of the month upon the face of each working place. During the three weeks in which he acted as fireman he never put a mark on the working places to show that he had been there. He had been about twenty years a miner, and he had seen special rules put on a board, but he never paid the least attention to them. He was appointed by the underground oversman, who did not make any inquiry as to his qualifications. The oversman did not bring under his notice the duties which he had to perform under the special rules, nor supply him with a copy of the rules, nor with a copy of the general rules. John Hunter, the underground oversman, stated that there was no entry in the book kept by Gillies as to fire-damp being found at any time, and he did not know that there was fire-damp lurking in that particular part of the pit. He made no inquiry as to the qualifications of Gillies when he appointed him. He did not bring under the notice of Gillies the fireman's duties under the special rules, but he told another official to take Gillies down and let him know the duties. A formal verdict was returned.

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"Dunfermline Press"
5 May, 1900

This issue also carried a Report on the Fatal Accident Inquiry into the death of Michael Rowley who died on 9th April in Dunfermline Cottage Hospital. Those giving evidence at the inquiry included: Henry Rowan, colliery manager; Robert Gilles; Daniel McGuire, mining contractor; Michael Clark; John Philp, miner; John Hunter, under-ground manager; William McLennan, pit inspector; and, Michael Rowley (son of deceased). The jury returned a formal verdict.

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"Dunfermline Press"
19 May, 1900

SEQUEL TO THE RECENT EXPLOSION AT KIRKFORD PIT
PIT INSPECTOR APPREHENDED ON A CHARGE
OF CULPABLE HOMICIDE

Robert Gilles, formerly pit inspector at Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath Colliery, was judicially examined before Hon. Sheriff Substitute Davidson, at Dunfermline, on a serious charge arising out of the fire-damp explosion in the underground workings of the Kirkford Pit, on 26th March last. ... The accused was released on bail payment of £20 being made.
The Report on the Fatal Accident Inquiry into the deaths of Andrew Brown and Thomas Glenny appeared in this issue. Among those giving evidence were:- Henry Rowan, colliery manager; Peter McArthur; Thomas Christie, inspector or foreman; Robert Drylie; and, Alexander Beveridge, miner. The jury returned a formal verdict
.

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"Dunfermline Press"
16 June, 1900

Robert Gilles, pit inspector, Crossgates, was to have appeared at a pleading diet of Dunfermline Sheriff and Jury Court, yesterday forenoon, in connection with the charges against him of culpable homicide, arising out of the fire-damp explosion at the Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath. ... The accused tendered a plea of not guilty. He will be tried before the Sheriff and a jury at Dunfermline on Monday, 25th June.

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"Dunfermline Press"
23 June, 1900

On Saturday, while James Sutherland, wheeler, Broad Street, Cowdenbeath, was at work in the Crawford [Kirkford] Pit a stone weighing about 8 cwts. fell from the roof upon one of his feet, injuring it so severely that the front part of the foot had to be amputated at the Dunfermline Cottage Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
30 June, 1900

This issue contains a full report of the trial at Dunfermline of Robert Gilles, formerly pit inspector at Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath, who was tried on a charge of culpable homicide arising out of the fire-damp explosion.
"The Jury, after five minutes' absence, returned a unanimous verdict of not guilty. The verdict was received with applause in Court, which was crowded with miners interested in the case. In respect of the verdict of the Jury, the accused was dismissed from the bar.

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"Dunfermline Press"
13 October, 1900
£100 for a Son's Death

This issue carried the report of the cash settlement made at the instance of Mrs Mary Kirk or Glenny, residing at Hill of Beath, against the Fife Coal Co. Ltd. Her son, Thomas Glenny, was working alongside Andrew Brown in Kirkford Pit on 1st May when both men were killed by a roof fall.

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 December, 1900

This issue carried the news that £400 damages and expenses had been awarded as settlement in the case of Daniel McGuire, mining contractor, Cowdenbeath, against the Fife Coal Company, Limited, for injuries received at the explosion of fire-damp at defenders' No. 10 Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath, in March last.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 April, 1901

Henry Cole, brusher, Foulford Road, had his right leg broken and was much bruised about the back by a quantity of stone falling upon him while he was engaged in the Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath, on Friday last.

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 June, 1901

A strike affecting 40 men has taken place at Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath. These men were compelled to draw on what was previously a horse road without any increase in their rates.

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"Dunfermline Press"
Saturday, 17 August, 1901

James Jaap, sixty-five years of age, a pit inspector, residing at Springhill, Crossgates, met with his death yesterday while employed in the five feet seam of the Kirkford Pit, wrought by the Fife Coal Company Limited. He was engaged at inspecting work when a stone came away from the roof in the working, and falling upon him killed him instantaneously.

See Fatal Accident report below.

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"Dunfermline Press"
10 August, 1901

Robert Dawson, miner, 70 Bridge Street, Cowdenbeath, met with a serious accident on Monday while employed in the five-feet seam of the Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath Colliery. A piece of coal weighing about ten cwts fell from Dawson's working face. He was knocked down and his left collar bone was fractured, his head badly cut and his left leg severely bruised. He was attended by Dr Craig, who ordered his removal to the Dunfermline Cottage Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
14 September, 1901

This issue carries the Report of the Fatal Accident Inquiry, held at Dunfermline Sheriff Court, into the death of James Japp, pit inspector, Crossgates, who was killed at Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath. Among those giving evidence were:- William Brown, manager; Charles Montague, miner, 45 Main Street, Lumphinnans; and Richard Montague (son of Charles Montague). The jury returned a formal verdict.

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"Dunfermline Press"
18 January, 1902

An accident of a somewhat peculiar nature is reported as having occurred at Kirkford Pit. Cornelius Dullivan, miner, High Street, Cowdenbeath, fearing a fall of loose stones after some blasting operations in connection with the formation of an air shaft, jumped from the platform on which he was standing. He landed in the air shaft, and fell a distance of fifty feet, fracturing his right collar bone, and receiving a cut on the back of his head.

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"Dunfermline Press"
18 January, 1902
ACCIDENTS IN THE KIRKFORD PIT
ONE MAN KILLED : ANOTHER INJURED

Two accidents occurred this week in the Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath Colliery, Fife Coal Company, Ltd. On Wednesday morning, Daniel Leonard, pit inspector, 32 Main Street, Hill of Beath, was injured by an explosion of gas while he was working in the five-feet seam prior to the men starting work for the day. He is said to have been carrying a naked lamp - an accumulation of gas not being expected. As the result of the explosion he was severely burned on the face, head, and arms. He was conveyed home and attended to by Dr Wm. Ramsay Nasmyth, Crossgates.
The other accident in the Kirkford Pit occurred on Thursday , between one and two o'clock, and unfortunately it terminated fatally. While John Smith, thirty-four years of age, a miner, residing at Bernard's Row, Crossgates, was at work in the pit a stone fell from the roof upon him. The stone struck the unfortunate man on the head and caused almost instantaneous death.

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 February, 1902

This issue carries the Report of the Fatal Accident Inquiry into the death of John Smith who was killed by a fall of stone in the Kirkford Pit. Among those giving evidence were:- William Richardson, manager, Kirkford Pit; Andrew Scott, oversman, Kirkford Pit; William Rennie, drawer, Telford Row, Crossgates (half-brother of deceased); and John Park, pit inspector. After further evidence, the jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence led.

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"Dunfermline Press"
15 March, 1902

John Park, fifty-eight years of age, a hanger-on, residing at Foulford Street, Cowdenbeath, was fatally injured on Wednesday in the five-feet seam of the Kirkford Pit, Fife Coal Company, Limited. He was engaged at the foot of the wheel brae hanging on empty hutches, when he was caught between a race of loaded hutches which was being let down the brae, and an empty hutch standing at the bottom. He was hard of hearing, and it is supposed he was not aware that the full hutches were coming down. He was taken home and attended to by Dr William Craig, Cowdenbeath, but succumbed to his injuries the same night.

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"Dunfermline Press"
Saturday, 12 April, 1902

This issue carried the Report of the Fatal Accident Inquiry held in Dunfermline Sheriff Court on Wednesday into the death of John Park, miner, who was fatally injured in Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath Colliery. Those giving evidence included:- William Edward Richardson, colliery manager; James Duff, miner, Foulford Road, Cowdenbeath; and John Park, junior, Foulford Place, Cowdenbeath, son of the deceased. The Jury returned a formal verdict.

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 May, 1902

James Horsburgh, miner, Foulford Place, Cowdenbeath, met with an accident on Wednesday in the Dunfermline splint seam of the Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath Colliery. He was employed at his working face when a large piece of coal suddenly came away, striking him on the left leg and breaking it between the knee and haunch. He was attended to by Dr Young, who ordered his removal to the Dunfermline Cottage Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
16 May, 1903

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Gillespie and a jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named John Woods, 58 Arthur Place, Cowdenbeath, who was run over by empty waggons and an engine on 4 May on the railway lyes of the Fife Coal Company, near Kirkford Pit, while going to said pit to commence work. Those giving evidence at the inquiry included;_ William Edward Richardson, manager; Angus Stein, miner, Natal Place, Cowdenbeath; John Robertson, shunter, 12 Foulford Place, Cowdenbeath; and George Todd, engine driver, Moss Road, Cowdenbeath. The jury, in their verdict, deprecated the practice of men riding on waggons, and expressed the hope that it would be put a stop to.

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"Dunfermline Press"
23 January, 1904

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Friday - before Sheriff Gillespie and a jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a pit inspector named James Syme, lately residing in Foulford Place, Cowdenbeath, who was injured on 26th November in Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath, by hutches in motion, from the effect of which injuries he died in Dunfermline Cottage Hospital on 4th January. Those giving evidence included:- Mary Birrell, nurse at Dunfermline Cottage Hospital; William Edward Richardson, colliery manager; David Glen, police constable, Cowdenbeath; James Sneddon, miner, Foulford Road, Cowdenbeath; and Thomas Smith, miner, Pretoria Road, Cowdenbeath.
Deceased was apparently crushed by an iron bar being placed on some hutches going up a wheelbrae. A formal verdict was returned by the jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 August, 1904

Over eighty of the workmen employed at Kirkford Pit sat down to supper in the Masonic Arms on Friday evening last, in honour of Mr John Hunter, under-manager at Kirkford, who has been promoted to more responsible duties at No. 11 Pit, Lumphinnans. Mr Innes, who presided, referred to the ability displayed by Mr Hunter as a colliery manager.

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 August, 1904

Owing to an accident in the shaft at Kirkford Colliery, Cowdenbeath, on Monday, the men could not be drawn to the surface. They had to find their way to Dalbeath Pit, which is one of the outlets from Kirkford.

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"Dunfermline Press"
13 August, 1904

Yesterday, John Telford, a drawer, fifteen years of age, residing at Brands Row, Crossgates, had one of his legs broken in the course of his work at Kirkford Pit. The lad was conveyed home in the colliery ambulance waggon and attended by Dr Nasmyth.

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"Dunfermline Journal"
September, 1904

On Wednesday, James Rooney, belonging to Kingseat, had his leg broken in Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath and on Thursday, in the same pit, Thomas Ross, miner, Foulford Place, had four of his ribs broken besides sustaining other injuries, in consequence of a stone, which he was in the act of propping up, falling from the face and knocking him out.

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"Dunfermline Press"
24 September, 1904

David Stein, miner's drawer, Foulford Road, had one of his legs broken in Kirkford pit on Friday last week. The rope on a wheel brae was thrown out of gear and Stein was struck by the rope and knocked against a building. Other four drawers were less seriously injured by the same cause.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 October, 1904

James Rooney, drawer, Store Row, Kingseat, met with an accident at the foot of the wheel-brae in the five-feet seam of the Crawford [sic] Pit, Fife Coal Company, on Monday. Two runaway hutches, jammed him against a building, and his left leg was broken between the knee and ankle. Dr Craig ordered his removal to the Dunfermline Cottage Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 October, 1904

Thomas Ross, miner, Foulford Place, Kirkford, was employed in the Dunfermline splint seam of the Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath, when a stone which he was in the act of propping fell from the face and knocked him down, fracturing four of his ribs, and causing a wound on the right eyebrow.

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"Dunfermline Press"
29 October, 1904

John Gorman (28), miner, Kirkford, Cowdenbeath, died on Sunday from injuries received on 7th October in Kirkford Pit, Fife Coal Coy. He was jammed between two runaway hutches and a wall, and was injured about the lower part of his body.

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"Dunfermline Press"
12 November, 1904

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Shennan and a jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named John Gorman, junior, lately residing at 1A Block, Kirkford, who, on 7th October, was injured in Kirkford pit, by being crushed between an empty hutch and the wall, in consequence of a certain chain breaking and causing a full hutch to run away down a brae. From the effects of his injuries Gorman died in the Dunfermline Cottage Hospital on 23rd October. Those giving evidence at the Inquiry included Dr Robertson, Dunfermline Cottage Hospital; William Edward Richardson, manager; and James Gorman, miner, brother of the deceased. A formal verdict was returned by the Jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
11 February, 1905

William O'Brien, brusher, residing at 21 Kirkford Rows, had both his legs broken in Kirkford Pit on Wednesday, owing to a fall of stones. He was removed to the Dunfermline Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 March, 1905

On Monday, a miner named James Watson, residing at Brown's Buildings, North Road, had a narrow escape in Kirkford Pit. In his working place he was almost buried by a fall of coal, which fortunately was soft and inflicted no serious injury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
12 August, 1905

An unfortunate accident occurred in the Kirkford Pit on Thursday, whereby James Dougray, miner, North Road, was seriously injured. In the course of his employment he was caught by a fall of stone and crushed against a hutch. Besides being severely bruised his breast bone was broken. He was medically attended after being removed to his home.

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"Dunfermline Press"
28 October, 1905

Mr Jas. Crichton, oversman, leaves Kirkford Pit to fill an appointment in the Lothians.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 December, 1905

To do honour to Mr W. E. Richardson, manager, who has left No. 10 Pit, Kirkford, to fill a similar position with the same company at the Mossgreen Pits, a few of his fellow-workmen met him in his own house on Monday evening. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 February, 1906

Alexander Michie, recently employed in the mine, but who, owing to a severe accident, had to find an easier task above ground, came by his death under sad circumstances on Monday. He was employed as a shunter at Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath. He is supposed to have been running wagons into the screens, and when leaning on his stick over one of the brakes, to have come in contact with the wagons in the next siding. He received a blow on the chest sufficient to cause death. Deceased was 27 years of age. He was married and lived at Lilly Place, Cowdenbeath.

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"Dunfermline Press"
28 April, 1906

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Shennan and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of a colliery waggon shunter named Alexander Michie, lately residing at Beath Bleachfield, who met with fatal injuries at Kirkford Pit on 12th February by being crushed between some waggons. Those giving evidence included:- David Farquharson, colliery manager; George Guthrie, pumping engineman, Foulford Road, Cowdenbeath; Thomas Simpson, locomotive engine-driver, 7 Kirkford Row, Cowdenbeath; and William Mitchell, shunter, Stevenson's Beath. The Jury returned a formal verdict.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 September, 1906

A miner, named Robert Muir, belonging to Back Row, Crossgates, but lodging for the time being in Foulford Street, Cowdenbeath, was accidentally killed in the Lochgelly splint seam of Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath, on Wednesday. When working at the face a part of the roof gave way, crushing him beneath about a ton of debris, and breaking his neck. Deceased was about thirty-two years of age, and was unmarried.

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"Dunfermline Press"
15 September, 1906

Bryan Mally, miner, residing in Stenhouse Street, while working in the Lochgelly splint seam in No. 10 pit, Kirkford, on Monday, was severely burned about the face and hands. He had been stemming a shot when, it is supposed, the detonator had exploded, causing the injuries. The following day he was conveyed to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 September, 1906

Early on Thursday morning two accidents occurred in the Kirkford Pit. In the first instance, while Robert Honeyman, Stenhouse Street, was doing repairing work a heavy bar slipped, and it, along with some debris, fell upon him, breaking one of his ribs and injuring him otherwise.
Sydney Lark, residing also in Stenhouse Street, was the sufferer in the second case. He was employed as a bencher, when the rope on the brae caught him and by throwing him to the pavement his leg was broken in two places and his ankle was dislocated.

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"Dunfermline Press"
29 September, 1906

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday" before Sheriff Shennan and a Jury" into the circumstances attending the death of a miner named Robert Muir, lately residing at 41 Foulford Street, Cowdenbeath, who was killed on 29th August in No. 10 Pit, Kirkford, by a fall of coal from the roof. Those giving evidence included:- David Jamieson, miner, Foulford Street, Cowdenbeath; James Paterson, fireman, 151 Foulford Road, Cowdenbeath; and David King, oversman, Shand´s Buildings, Cowdenbeath. The Jury delivered a verdict in accordance with the evidence led.

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"Dunfermline Press"
10 November, 1906

A serious accident occurred on Thursday afternoon in No. 10 Pit, Cowdenbeath Colliery. John Jones, miner, Kirkford Row, and Robert McLeod, miner, Pretoria Place, were engaged in repairing work on a wheel brae in the five-feet seam when they observed a girder in an unstable condition, and were about to make it secure. For that purpose they went underneath it, and while they were in the act of making a measurement the roof collapsed and fell upon them. After some difficulty, the men were extricated. It was then found that both were seriously injured. Jones had his left leg broken a little above the ankle, and there were slight bruises on his back; while McLeod was suffering from a broken thigh, a scalp wound, and back bruises. The injuries to McLeod were of such a severe character that Dr Craig deemed it necessary to have the man removed to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital.

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H. M. Inspector of Mines Report 1907
Mr. Robert McLaren's Report

Fatal Accident at Cowdenbeath No. 10, Fife
Owner: Fife Coal Co., Ltd.
18 April, 1907

Joseph Shearer, 16, Drawer. Deceased hung an empty tub on the rope, and a miner at the top pushed over his loaded tub, and while tubs were in motion the wheel tree broke and loaded tub crashed into the empty tub at bottom of brae, which struck deceased and killed him.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 April, 1907

On Thursday, a young miner named Joseph Shearer, residing with his parents in Foulford Road, Cowdenbeath, was injured internally by being struck with some hutches while employed on a wheelbrae in Kirkford Pit. He was conveyed to Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital, where he succumbed to his injuries later in the day.

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"The Scotsman"
20 April, 1907

FIFE PIT FATALITY. - The thirty-first pit fatality which has occurred in Fife this year, was reported yesterday. Joseph Shearer, a pit drawer, residing at Foulford Road, Cowdenbeath, had been injured in the Fife Coal Company's Kirkford through being jammed between two hutches on a wheel brae, and he died in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 April, 1907

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Shennan and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of Joseph Shearer, pit drawer, lately residing at 168 Foulford Road, Cowdenbeath, who was injured on 18th April on a wheelbrae in Kirkford Pit by a runaway hutch, and died on the same day in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital. Those giving evidence included:- David Wallace Farquharson, colliery manager; William Miller, miner; Thomas Hunter, fireman; William Robb, miner; and James Newlands, oversman. A formal verdict was returned.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 April, 1907

Thomas Matthewson, miner, had his face severely lacerated by a burst of coal in Kirkford Pit on Thursday.

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H. M. Inspector of Mines Report 1907
Mr. Robert McLaren's Report
Fatal Accident at Cowdenbeath No. 10, Fife
Owner: Fife Coal Co., Ltd.
22 July, 1907

Patrick McGartland, 34, Miner. William Ostler, 18, Driver. Deceased and another man, were engaged making an airway, through waste ground, when a large fall occurred, displacing some timber which had been recently set, and burying the three men. Ostler with the assistance of the third man managed to get himself freed, and groped his way in the dark to where a pony stood, it led him to the shaft bottom, where he got help. McGartland died before being extricated, and Ostler died five days later. At the Fatal Accident Inquiry, subsequently held into the circumstances of the accident the jury, very properly, commended the plucky action of Ostler in going for help travelling a distance of 500 yards without a light, although himself fatally injured.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 July, 1907
MINERS ENTOMBED AT COWDENBEATH
ONE MAN KILLED - TWO INJURED

The district of Cowdenbeath has once more provided an illustration of the dangers to which underground workers are exposed, as well as a demonstration of that heroism which has been repeatedly displayed by the Fife miner in case of serious accident to his fellow-worker. For the purpose of improved ventilation an airway was being formed in the Lochgelly splint seam between Mossbeath and Kirkford pits, belonging to the Fife Coal Company, Limited. The work was stopped during the holidays of last week, and, as frequently happens on such occasions, a fall took place from the roof. In order to clear away the fallen materials, a number of men started to work at ten o'clock on Sunday night, but the course had not been cleared of the rubbish when they finished.
Another shift, consisting of Patrick McGartland, brusher; William Calligan, fireman; and William Ostler, drawer, descended at two o'clock on Monday afternoon, using for convenience the downcast shaft of the Kirkford Pit. They had almost completed operations, and were engaged in setting props and bars, when, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, another heavy fall from the roof took place. It is estimated that about six tons of the strata was dislodged and dropped on to the roadway, burying McGartland, Calligan, and Ostler. Fortunately, the timber prevented the men from being smothered, and they were able to speak to each other. Ostler, who was less seriously pinned down, succeeded in getting himself clear. The place was, however, in total darkness, the lights having been extinguished by the fall, and Ostler, stunned by being struck down, was at first in a dilemma as to how to proceed. By a fortuitous circumstance he came in contact with his pony, and by it he was piloted to the stables at the end of the section. Here his difficulties increased, for he had afterwards to crawl on his hands and knees for a long distance, said to be nearly a mile, with only the hutch rails for his compass, until he reached the pit bottom. By the time he gained this point he was in a pitiable condition, the awful experience he had had in his temporary entombment and his subsequent struggle along the dark passages having bruised and bled and exhausted him. An alarm was soon raised, and a rescue party was organised by Peter McArthur, oversman. Lights being procured, the heroic company set out along the roads, and without mishap they reached the imprisoned brusher and fireman. Nothing was visible of Calligan but his head and left arm, while McGartland was entirely out of sight. Much time did not elapse before Calligan was relieved, and he seemed to be less seriously hurt than had been expected, but it was an arduous task that had to be faced in endeavouring to rescue McGartland, as he had been caught in the centre of the fall, and he could not easily be got at.
The man was still alive, for he spoke from time to time to those who were exerting themselves to save him. He was last heard about nine o'clock, and it was more than an hour later that his lifeless body was dragged from the heap.
Amongst those who descended at a later hour than McArthur and his gallant party were Mr Richardson and Mr Farquharson, the managers of the Mossbeath and Kirkford Pits respectively. Drs Craig and Young were also on the scene with ambulance appliances.
Much sympathy has been expressed in the district for McGartland's widow, who is left with three children. The deceased, an Irishman, was a strong advocate of temperance, and was held in high esteem by his fellow workmen.
Calligan is an unmarried man of about thirty years of age, and Ostler, whose gallantry has earned the encomiums of his fellows, is a lad still in his teens. At first the brave lad was inclined to make light of his injuries. His condition became serious, however, on Tuesday evening, and it was deemed advisable to remove him to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital.

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"The Scotsman"
29 July, 1907

DEATH OF A FIFE PIT HERO. - The death occurred in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital on Saturday evening under somewhat pathetic circumstances of William Ostler, pit drawer, Cowdenbeath. It was Ostler who, with the assistance of William Calligan, the pit inspector, was first released from the heavy fall from the roof in the Fife Coal Company's Mossbeath Pit, Cowdenbeath, on Monday night last week, and he crawled on his hands and knees a distance of about a mile through the workings in the dark to the pit bottom. Beyond his bruises and scratches he did not at the time feel his injuries much, but it seems his skull had been fractured before he set out on his arduous journey.

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"Dunfermline Press"
3 August, 1907
THE MOSSBEATH PIT DISASTER
ANOTHER VICTIM

William Ostler, the young man who behaved so gallantly in securing assistance for his two comrades who were entombed in the underground workings of the Mossbeath Pit, Cowdenbeath, died in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital on Saturday evening.
Ostler, it may be recalled, was badly injured by the heavy fall which took place from the roof, and which enveloped other two men, one of whom was found to be dead before being extricated. Suffering from severe scalp wounds, and with blood streaming down his face, Ostler groped his way to the pit bottom, a distance of about one mile, with the hutch rails for his compass, and he was almost in a state of collapse by the time he had "chapped" to the surface for assistance. At first his condition was not regarded as serious. As he gradually became worse, however, it was deemed advisable to remove him to the hospital, where, as stated, he died on Saturday. Fracture of the skull is believed to have been the cause of death.

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"Dunfermline Press"
14 September, 1907

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Shennan and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of Patrick McGarthland, brusher, lately residing at 14 Foulford Street, Cowdenbeath, and William Ostler, drawer, lately residing at 23 Foulford Place, Cowdenbeath, who were killed in Kirkford Pit by a fall of material. Those giving evidence at the inquiry included:- William Edward Richardson, colliery manager, Mossbeath; William Callighan, brusher, 4 Park Street, Cowdenbeath; Robert Brownlie, roadsman; and Peter McArthur, oversman. Mr Andrew Strachan, one of the jurymen, said that the jury wished to express their admiration of the conduct of the deceased man Ostler in going for assistance to his two comrades. The Sheriff observed that that was a very proper thing for the jury to do.

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"Dunfermline Press"
7 December, 1907

An engineer of middle age named Thomas Wilson, and residing at Hill of Beath, had three of his fingers taken off by their being caught between the chain and pulley of a block and tackle at No. 10 Pit, Kirkford, on Thursday.

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"Dunfermline Press"
14 December, 1907

A large number of the workmen of Nos. 7 and 10 Pits assembled in the Masonic Arms on Saturday evening for the purpose of making a presentation to Mr D. Farquharson, their late manager, who has removed to a colliery in the Pittenweem district.

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"Dunfermline Press"
11 January, 1908

Daniel Ferris, miner, 19 Kirkland Street, Cowdenbeath, was badly injured by being struck by a runaway hutch in the Lochgelly splint seam of Kirkford Pit on Tuesday. His injuries consisted of bruises on the right side and legs, and cuts on the right side of the head.

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"Dunfermline Press"
8 February, 1908

Owing to a hutch falling down and damaging the slides in the Kirkford Pit on Wednesday morning, winding operations had to be suspended for the day. The workmen found an outlet by the other shafts, and the damage being repaired within a few hours, they were able to resume work next day.

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"Dunfermline Press"
16 May, 1908

James McQueen, a brusher, residing at Foulford Street, had his left leg accidentally broken while he was working in the Glassie seam of No. 10 Pit, Kirkford, on Wednesday night.

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"Dunfermline Press"
19 September, 1908

A brusher, named Daniel Nocher, residing at Foulford Place, ran a narrow escape of losing his life in Kirkford Pit on Monday morning. He was working at the brushing in the Glassie seam, replacing a cross-bar that had become dislodged, when a few tons of material broke away from the roof. Fortunately he was only struck by a few of the falling stones and escaped with bruises on the head and left side of the body.

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 September, 1908

Numerous accidents occurred at the beginning of the week. ... On Tuesday, Henry Logan, miner, Ure's Buildings, Stenhouse Street, and Thomas Skimming, 58 Foulford Place, were filling a hutch in the Dunfermline Splint (west side) seam, in the Kirkford Pit, when a large stone fell upon them. Logan's legs and the lower part of his body was bruised and Skimming had a number of ribs broken, besides receiving bruises on the right side. - In the same pit, David Mitchell, drawer, also living at 58 Foulford Place, was badly injured by being struck with a runaway hutch on a wheelbrae. ... Skimming and Mitchell were taken to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 February, 1909

Thomas Ferguson, a sectional oversman, in Kirkford Pit, was injured about the lower part of the body by a fall of stone while repairs were being carried out on the main road in the Lochgelly Splint Seam.

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"Dunfermline Press"
20 March, 1909

This issue carried the news that a sum of 350 had been paid to settle the action raised by the widow and children of Patrick McGarthland, employed at Foulford [sic] Pit, Cowdenbeath, on 22 July 1907. He had been employed in forming an air course between Kirkford and Mossbeath Pits when he was struck by timber.

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"The Scotsman"
9 June, 1909

THE CLOSURE OF MAURICEWOOD PIT. The filling up of the shaft at Mauricewood Pit has been completed, and after the sale of plant tomorrow, no evidence of the past existence of the pit will remain except the large blaize heap. Yesterday the late manager, Mr Robert Crawford, entered upon his new duties as mining manager of the Kirkford and No. 7 Cowdenbeath Collieries of the Fife Coal Company (Limited) - the two shafts affording work to over a thousand men, and having an average daily output of 1900 tons.

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 July, 1909

While winding coals in Kirkford Pit, Hill of Beath, on Tuesday afternoon, the coupling connecting the ropes to the cage snapped, and the cage, which was at the pithead, was precipitated to the bottom, a distance of between 200 and 300 fathoms. Had the accident happened fifteen minutes later, the men would have been ascending from the day shift, when there would probably have been 16 men on the cage.

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"Dunfermline Press"
21 August, 1909

A brusher named James Brady (unmarried) residing at Kirkford Row, had his back severely injured by a fall of stone in No. 11 Pit, Lumphinnans, on Thursday night. He was conveyed to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
Saturday, September 4, 1909

Michael Macfarlane, forty-two years of age, residing at Foulford Place, Cowdenbeath, was fatally injured in Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath Colliery, yesterday. While he was engaged as a roadsman on a wheel brae, a stone fell suddenly upon him from the side of the brae crushing him severely. He was conveyed to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital where his right arm was amputated. He succumbed to his injuries a few hours later. Deceased is survived by a widow and family.

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"Dunfermline Press"
4 September, 1909

Henry Fitzpatrick, a roadsman, residing in Broad Street, was badly crushed while following his employment in Kirkford Pit on Wednesday.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 September, 1909

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Shennan and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of Michael Macfarlane, roadsman, 54 Foulford Place, Cowdenbeath, who was injured on 3 September in No. 10 pit, Cowdenbeath, by a stone falling upon him from the roadside, and who died late in the same day in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital. Those giving evidence included:- Alexander McLeod, surveyor, Cowdenbeath; Bryan Brady, pit repairer, Foulford Place, Cowdenbeath; John Graham, fireman, 6 Pretoria Place, Cowdenbeath; Robert Honeyman, sectional oversman; and Peter McArthur, oversman. After further evidence an open verdict was given by the Jury.

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"Dunfermline Press"
4 December, 1909

A miner named George Lockhart, residing at North End, was severely injured in Kirkford Pit on Tuesday by a fall of material. One of his legs was fractured, and a number of his ribs were broken. He was removed to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
10 September, 1910

Miss Maggie Yates, employed as office girl at Kirkford Pit, has received from her co-workers a handsome eight-day clock and silver jelly dish on the occasion of her marriage.

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 August, 1911
COLLIERY MANAGER'S SUCCESS

Mr David Farquharson, sometime manager at Kirkford, has passed an examination for first class mining certificates in West Virginia, U.S.A. The number of students sitting was 72, and 19 passed. Mr Farquharson took first place with 96 per cent., the next best being 87 per cent.

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"Dunfermline Press"
18 November, 1911

A miner named Alexander Malcolm, residing at 18 Kirkford Street, Cowdenbeath, received severe injuries in the Kirkford Pit on Monday. He had been standing in the pit bottom waiting on a cage to convey him to the surface when he was knocked into the sump by some moving hutches. One of the tubs fell upon him, breaking his collar bone and fracturing his skull. He was taken to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital.

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"Dunfermline Press"
31 August, 1912

Andrew Martin (22), miner, 16 Mungall Street, sustained a comminuted fracture of the left collar bone by a piece of coal falling upon him while he was lying "holing" in the Dunfermline splint seam of No. 10 Pit, Kirkford.

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 October, 1912

Mr Robert Crawford, who has been in charge of the Fife Coal Company's colliery at Kirkford for several years, has been promoted to the charge of the Dunnikier Colliery, belonging to the same Company. He is succeeded at Kirkford by Mr George Christie, who has been manager of Benarty Colliery for some years.

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 February, 1913

This issue carried the news that Mr John Cook, engineman, Kirkford Colliery, was met by a number of his fellow-workmen on Saturday, on the occasion of his leaving for South Africa today.

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 January, 1914

... During the repairs on the winding gear at Kirkford Pit, an engineer's labourer named Arthur Boag, and residing in Dunfermline, had one of his legs broken by a piece of the drum covering falling upon it.

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"Dunfermline Press"
21 March, 1914

On Thursday, Sinclair McLeod (26), brusher, 12 Pretoria Place, Cowdenbeath, and William Millar, 6 Reading Room Row, Hill of Beath, were injured while engaged clearing a fall in the Gardener's dook, five feet seam, No. 10 pit. When McLeod went to the top of the fallen material, coal gas, which had accumulated, ignited, burning him about the face and hands. Millar suffered a good deal from shock.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 May, 1914

Mr John Mitchell was met in the Masonic Arms on Saturday by a number of his fellow-workmen at No. 10 Colliery, and presented with a tobacco pipe and pouch on the occasion of his early departure for Western Australia. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
19 September, 1914

Robert Binnie (45), miner, Pretoria Place, Cowdenbeath, met with a nasty accident in No. 10 pit, Cowdenbeath, on Tuesday. He had just arrived at his working place when he discovered that a prop had been displaced. He was in the act of setting another prop when a stone, weighing about twelve cwt., fell from the roof. The stone struck him on the head and knocked him down. In addition to cuts about the head, Binnie was suffering from injuries to his left hand. He was taken to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital, where it was found necessary to amputate the thumb and the index and third fingers of the left hand.

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 September, 1914

On Tuesday, Robt. Horsburgh (50), miner, Victoria Place, Cowdenbeath, was admitted to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital suffering from a fracture of his right leg. Horsburgh was endeavouring to get out of the way of a fall from his coal face in No. 10 Pit, Cowdenbeath, when he was jammed between a prop and the material which fell.

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"Dunfermline Press"
25 March, 1916

Frank Petrie, 183 Foulford Road, had the muscles of his right leg badly torn by being caught in a coal cutting machine that had been accidentally set going in Kirkford Pit on Tuesday.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 May, 1916

William McFadyen, miner, had one of his legs fractured above the ankle in No. 10 Pit, Cowdenbeath Colliery, on Tuesday. He was engaged in a roadway when there was an unexpected roof fall, which practically buried him. He was conveyed to his residence, after being medically attended to.

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"Dunfermline Press"
29 December, 1917

An overwinding accident occurred at Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath, early on Monday morning, resulting in James Young, shaftsman, being injured. Young happened to be on the descending cage, and he suffered by the sudden drop to the bottom. Owing to the state of the winding apparatus, he had to be carried to No. 7 Pit to be brought to the surface. Kirkford Pit was rendered idle for the day. Young was one of the injured in the No. 7 Pit accident which occurred in January.

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"The Scotsman"
24 November, 1920

MAN KILLED IN COWDENBEATH PIT. - James Smith, pit repairer, who resided with his parents at Fernbank, Kelty, was fatally injured in Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath, yesterday. He had been at work making a haulage room in the No. 2 coal dook, when a large stone breaking away from the side fell upon him. He died a few minutes after the accident.

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"Dunfermline Press"
27 November, 1920

James Smith, 48 years of age, a pit repairer, who resided at Kelty, was the victim of a fatal accident in No. 10 Pit, Kirkford Colliery, Cowdenbeath, on Tuesday. Smith was engaged making a haulage room in the two-feet coal dook, and was trying to dislodge a stone when it came away unexpectedly, and falling on him caused such injuries that he expired almost immediately. Smith had resided all his life in the district; with the exception of a few years during which he was in the United States. He was unmarried, and lived with his parents at Fernbank Home, Kelty.

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"West Fife Echo"
25 December, 1920

... In No. 10 Pit, Kirkford Colliery, Cowdenbeath, Geo. Chapman (26) was killed by a fall from the roof. He had been engaged in the five foot seam when a large stone crushed him to the "pavement", and when released he was found to have been killed instantly. He leaves a widow and three children, who reside in South Street, Cowdenbeath.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 January, 1921

On Friday last week George Chapman, twenty-six years of age, who resided at 16 South Street, Cowdenbeath, was killed by a fall of stone while at work in the five feet seam of Kirkford Pit. Death was instantaneous. He leaves a widow and three of a family.

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"Dunfermline Press"
15 January, 1921

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, inquiries were held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the deaths of several miners, all of which were the result of roof or side falls, the jury returning formal verdicts in all cases.
Little detail was included in the newspaper report of these cases which included James Smith, repairer, lately residing at Fernbank Cottages, Kelty, who was struck by a stone which fell upon him in No. 10 Kirkford pit, Fife Coal Company, Limited; and George Chapman, lately residing at 16 South Street, Cowdenbeath, who was fatally injured by a fall of material from the roof in the same pit.

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The Great Lock-out of 1921
(local newspaper report)

"When the meeting had ended, several thousand miners, headed by the band, and led by union officials marched to the pit. Behind them, the Hill of Beath Pipe Band headed another procession of Hill of Beath villagers; and in their ranks there were a fair number of women.
After the procession had reached Kirkford Pit, there was an ominous sound of escaping steam, a loud hissing noise proclaiming that the boilers were being "let off".
The procession then marched on to Dalbeath Pit, Hill of Beath. Here they were incensed at finding, among managers and other officials, Mr. Spalding (the Agent) himself at work in fire holes. At this there were lively scenes, which the Dunfermline Press describes.
"Mr. Spalding was the object of the men's anger. The strikers got hold of him, and after very rough treatment a consultation was held. Various suggestions were made but ultimately he was marched away from the pit-head, the police being powerless to deal with the crowd. Mr. Spalding was hustled along the road to Cowdenbeath and, at the bleachfield ponds, a suggestion to throw him in was made but was not carried into effect. He was hauled past his home in Bridge Street, down to High Street. A brick was thrown which unfortunately struck a man named Wilson and made an ugly wound on his head. He was taken away for medical attention.
The police made an attempt to rescue Mr. Spalding but were unsuccessful and the march was continued, the victim presenting a sorrowful appearance. At the corner of Union Street, a spirit of humour seemingly seized the crowd. Some miners hoisted him on their shoulders and he was derisively asked to make a speech.
The police now greatly strengthened, effected a rescue and got Mr. Spalding on a tram-car going towards the north-end of the town. A few of the police tried to keep the crowd back and an ugly situation arose.
Baton charges were made and the crowd replied with stones. Several of the police were injured and in the baton charges several of the crowd, and unfortunately mostly those who were taking no part in the melee, were victims of the blows. This incensed the crowd, but gradually, though great excitement prevailed at the time, the streets resumed their normal appearance."

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"Dunfermline Press"
4 June, 1921

While three men were working at a cage that had stuck in the shaft of Kirkford Pit, on Sunday, it accidentally fell to the bottom, drawing with it the rope intended to suspend it from beams at the mouth of the shaft. Fortunately, none of the men were struck by the falling material.

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"Dunfermline Press"
2 July, 1921

... In the Cowdenbeath district, Kirkford is the deepest pit. There, the main pumping plant for the area is installed. Although pumping has been proceeded with to some extent during the whole period of the dispute, it has been found that serious flooding has occurred. If, however, it is found that the pit bottom is clear of water, it will be possible to accommodate men in the whole of the rise workings. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
9 July, 1921

... A breakdown in the pumping plant has retarded the resumption of No. 1 Pit, Lumphinnans Colliery, and there has been nothing done so far in the way of coal getting in Kirkford and other pits at which pumping apparatus is installed for a series of collieries. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
23 July, 1921
COWDENBEATH PITS

All the pits at Cowdenbeath are producing coal again with the exception of Kirkford Pit, where the water is very heavy. At Lumphinnans, everything is being done to put the two pits into working order.

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"Dunfermline Press"
1 October, 1921
COLLIERY MANAGER'S DEATH.

Mr Geo. S. Christie, who was manager of No. 7 and No. 10 Pits, Cowdenbeath, till illness last year forced him to give up the appointment, died at his residence, Marchmont, Cowdenbeath, on Thursday morning. In earlier years, Mr Christie had charge of pits in the Kelty and Blairadam Collieries of the Fife Coal Company, and for fully two years he was manager of a colliery at New Cumnock, Ayrshire. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
19 November, 1921

A sad accident befell Thomas McBride, 63 Foulford Place, Cowdenbeath, a shunter employed at Kirkford Colliery, on Tuesday, resulting in both legs being fractured. The accident occurred while he was conducting shunting operations at the siding. The first of a race of waggons, on which he was riding, was thrown off the line by striking an obstruction, and on his falling off, the waggons passed over his legs. He was speedily removed to Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital, where it was found necessary to amputate one of the injured limbs.

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 November, 1921

It is proposed to double-shift No. 10 Pit, Kirkford, and No. 11 Pit, Lumphinnans, a step that should absorb many of the unemployed. The back shift at No. 7 Pit is to be withdrawn.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
25 January, 1922

George Dick, Perth Road, Cowdenbeath, was severely injured about the lower part of the body on Saturday while at work in No. 10 pit. Dick is an acrobat who has often performed at sports and games throughout the country.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
5 July, 1922

The issue noted the death of Mr John Dickson, on Thursday last at the residence of his son, 40 Foulford Place, Cowdenbeath.
Mr Dickson was well known in mining circles as a pit sinking and stone mine contractor. Retired from active work nearly eighteen months ago, his last employment being with the Fife Coal Coy., Ltd., at Kirkford Colliery. He had the contract for sinking No. 1 and No. 2 Pits, Mossbeath Colliery (Cowdenbeath Coal Company).

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
12 July, 1922

Mr Robert Gillespie, colliery manager in charge of No. 10 Pit, Kirkford, and No. 7 Pit, Cowdenbeath, has been appointed to succeed Mr W. C. Bridgewood, Aberhill House, Methil, as agent for the Fife Coal Company Ltd., at Leven. Since coming to Cowdenbeath fully a year ago Mr Gillespie has proved himself to be a very capable manager, and now that he has been promoted to a more responsible position he will doubtless prove himself worthy of the appointment he has received.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
16 August, 1922
SOURCE OF DANGER - KIRKFORD BURNING BING

For about a year the old bing, at No. 10 Pit, Kirkford Colliery, has been on fire, causing damage to vegetation, &c. in the vicinity. From time to time workmen have been engaged trying to put the fire out, but their efforts have not been successful.
Recently the fire has been coming nearer the pithead, in spite of all that has been done to prevent it from spreading. On Sunday, a large squad of men were engaged digging at the pithead, the situation having become serious, the framework of the pithead being in danger. A certain measure of success was accomplished, but it is computed that the bing will continue to burn for at least another twelve months yet, it being almost impossible to put out such a fire, which is caused by spontaneous combustion.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
23 August, 1922

The burning bing at Kirkford Colliery continues to give the management trouble. During all last week men were engaged digging trenches to keep the fire from spreading and doing damage. The scaffolding between the pithead and the bing has collapsed in consequence of the fire, a sawmill engine-house also having been demolished. Considerable damage has been done, but it is expected that by building brick walls and trenching that success will be achieved and the fire confined to the bing and prevented from spreading to where it will cause damage. In addition to the men employed by the Fife Coal Co., Ltd., Mr Peter Adamson, contractor, Cowdenbeath, has since Thursday had a squad of men digging, with gratifying results. The outbreak is one of the most serious the Company has had to contend with for some years.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
9 August, 1922

An Inquiry at Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, into the death of Thomas Honeyman Paterson (33), residing at Foulford Road, Cowdenbeath ....

... on the 3rd July, deceased injured his side by falling against an empty hutch, and died a few hours after returning home. ... Robert Gillespie (43), is mentioned as the colliery manager - he was in this position at the Kirkford Colliery. ... The jury at the Sheriff Court on Monday on the recommendation of the Sheriff, recorded a verdict to the effect that the man's death was not due to the accident, but to the bacillus of gas gangrene. ... In other words he died of an infection which must have set up very quickly.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
2 August, 1922

Mr John Alexander, oversman, No. 7 Pit, Cowdenbeath, has been appointed to succeed Mr Robert Gillespie as manager of Kirkford Colliery and No. 7 Pit.
Mr Andrew Scott, oversman, Kirkford Colliery, has been transferred to a similar position at the Aitken Pit, Kelty.
It is understood that the colliery managers in the employment of the Fife Coal Coy., Ltd., have been asked to submit to a very substantial reduction of their salaries, and that in future, oversmen will have to pay house rent, and also for their fire coal.

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"Dunfermline Press"
18 August, 1923

John Galbraith, secretary of the Scottish Colliery Enginemen's Association, Cowdenbeath Branch, an engineman employed at No. 10 Pit, Cowdenbeath, lies in Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital with a fractured right leg below the knee, the result of an accident that took place while at work on Wednesday. Galbraith was proceeding up a stair to the "duff" bing when he overbalanced and fell. He is a resident of Kingseat.

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"Dunfermline Press"
13 October, 1923

While Robert Johnstone (39), miner, 181 Broad Street, Cowdenbeath, was working in the Diamond seam of No. 10 Pit, Cowdenbeath Colliery, on Monday, a stone, about 18 inches square, fell from the roof and struck him on the back, causing serious spinal injuries. On being medically examined by Dr Young, he was removed to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times and Advertiser"
27 February, 1924
WORKMEN'S COAL AT KIRKFORD

The contract for driving the workmen's fire coal at Kirkford Colliery has been secured by Mr Jas. Ruddick, Kirkford. The previous contractor was Mr Lovat Raine, Cowdenbeath.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times and Advertiser"
27 February, 1924
ACCIDENT TO BAILIE LESSLIE

On Thursday, while engaged at his work underground at Kirkford Colliery, Bailie Lesslie had his left hand badly bruised in consequence of a fall of stones from the roof.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
16 July, 1924
FATAL RESULT OF A COLLIERY ACCIDENT

Wm. Kelly, miner, 24 years of age, who resided with his father in Park Street, Cowdenbeath, died in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital on Saturday. The deceased was crushed in an accident in No. 10 Pit, Cowdenbeath. The accident took place about a month ago.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
10 September, 1924

Kirkford Miners' Welfare Institute which has been erected on the north side of Foulford Road, Cowdenbeath, was formally opened on Saturday afternoon in the presence of a large gathering. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
17 December, 1924

Joseph O'Donnell (41), a miner, who resides at Cocklaw Street, Kelty, was removed to the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital on Friday in a critical condition, the result of an accident which took place at the High Glassee section of No. 10 Pit, Cowdenbeath.

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"Dunfermline Press"
4 February, 1925

A COWDENBEATH TRAGEDY
TWO MINERS KILLED
SAD ACCIDENTS AT KIRKFORD PIT

A gloom was cast over our town on Monday, as the consequence of tragic occurrences at Kirkford Pit. Within the short space of an hour, two men were killed and three others injured. There were two separate accidents. In the first case three men were buried by a fall of redd from the roof. Two men were killed, and the other seriously injured. Half an hour earlier there was an explosion of gunpowder in the same colliery, and two workers were severely burned.
The pit is known as No. 10, and belongs to the Fife Coal Company, Ltd. The most serious accident of the two was in the Glassee seam about five o'clock in the afternoon. Drs Veitch and Macdonald had been called to the pit to attend to the men burned by the explosion, when news reached the pithead of the even more sad occurrence. The story was that a fall had occurred and that three men were buried below the material.
Steps were promptly taken to effect a rescue. In the meantime word was sent to the manager, Mr John Alexander, and he immediately stopped the pit, a rescue party was organised and made for the scene of the fall with all speed. It was a situation that called for courage and skill.
They at once set to work in the heading, hoping that they might be able to get the men out alive, and there was some encouragement for them when they found one alive. He had, however, been caught by the edge of the fall. They had some difficulty in getting him clear, but eventually managed it. All the time he was conscious, but suffering much from bruises, and after he was taken out he complained about injury to his legs. Anderson was speedily sent to the surface, and in the dressing room there the two doctors did all they could to alleviate his condition.
Meantime, the news of the accidents spread, and a crowd collected. Ambulance waggons were very promptly on the spot, and it was in one of these that the injured man was removed to his home in Foulford Place.
The work of the rescue party still went on. They worked desperately hard. It was nearing eight o'clock when they got through to their comrades, and they found their worst fears realised. Both men were dead, having probably been instantaneously killed. The sad news soon got abroad throughout the town, and created profound sorrow and sympathy.
The dead men are -
William McArthur, 17 years, son of Archibald McArthur, New Houses, Foulford Road.
Robert Sharp, 36 years. He resided with his widowed mother at 178 Foulford Road.
The injured man, David [Peter] Anderson, is 20 years of age, residing with his father, Wm. Anderson, Foulford Place.
So far as is known, the accident was due to the fall of a girder, while the beams which it supported thus became loose and the roof caved in.

RUSH TO THE RESCUE.

The noise of the fall brought the other workmen scurrying along from the coal face, and they set to work with a will to release the unfortunate trio. Among the rescuers was Archibald McArthur, father of William, and, on learning that his son was buried beneath the mass of stone, he was quite overcome.
The work of rescue went on apace, and frequently as they worked the men could hear Sharp's voice, "Are you there?" After some time Peter Anderson was released, and it was discovered that, although he escaped with his life, he had bruises, and was cut all over the body, on the shoulders, ribs and legs, and large lumps on his head.
So large a quantity of redd has fallen that several hours elapsed before the body of McArthur was recovered. McArthur was terribly injured, the girder falling right on top of him, and from the nature of his wounds death must have been instantaneous. No severe injuries were apparent on Sharp's body, and it is presumed that he was suffocated.
Anderson, in the course of a short interview on Monday night, gave a pathetic account of the tragedy, and told how he bade a last farewell to Sharp while they were buried alive.
"The three of us were together when the accident took place," he said. "We were being held up for want of empties (hutches), and we all sat down at the side of the workings to wait until they came. I was sitting about three feet away from the others, and McArthur was right beneath the girder."
"There was no warning. The girder fell, and the roof came down. I did not lose consciousness, and I could hear Sharp not very far away. He cried to me, "Are you there, Pete?" "Ay, Bobby," I said. "I am gone," he said, 'good-bye.' 'Goodbye,' I answered. I could hear him 'roaring'."
"I could hear the men speaking above me and removing the redd," Anderson continued, "so I knew I was all right. I don't know how long I was in being got out. I was sitting beneath the girder, and I shifted just before it came down," he added.

THE GUNPOWDER EXPLOSION.

The other accident, which occurred before the more serious one, was also of a distressing nature. In the same pit, round about four o'clock, there was an explosion in the Diamond Section. The injured men were -
John Easson, residing in Foulford Place,
David Clark, 53 Chapel Street.
Both are married, and, as a result of the accident, were badly burned. They received the best attention possible on the pithead from Drs Veitch and Macdonald. Clark was taken to hospital at Dunfermline, and Easson, who is a young married man with a family, was taken to his home.
Clark, who was more seriously injured than Easson, had to be taken to Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital, where, on inquiry at a late hour last night, he was said to be doing well. He is suffering from extensive but not deep burns to the arms and face, and up till the time of inquiry there was no sign of shock.

WORK SUSPENDED YESTERDAY.

As a mark of respect to their dead comrades, the workers at Kirkford did not go to work yesterday. At a late hour on Monday night a meeting was hurriedly summoned, when it was agreed, out of respect for the deceased, that the pit would not be working today (Tuesday). Upon inquiry it was found that work at the scene of the accident was stopped owing to the scarcity of hutches. If work had been proceeding as usual, more than three men would have been working at the scene of the fall.

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"Cowdenbeath & Lochgelly Times"
18 March, 1925

This issue carried the report of the Fatal Accident Inquiry, held before the Sheriff at Dunfermline, on Thursday, into the case in which William McArthur, drawer, and Robert Sharp, miner, lately residing at 198 and 178 Foulford Road, respectively, who died in No. 10 Pit, Cowdenbeath, on 2 February, from injuries received by a fall of stone from the roof. Among those giving evidence were:- John Alexander, colliery manager; and Peter Anderson (19), drawer, Foulford Place, Cowdenbeath.
The jury added to their verdict, a suggestion made by the Sheriff, who said the evidence disclosed some differences of opinion as to how the roof bars in this heading, where the accident took place, were held up. ... He stated, "The jury might wish to add, on the basis of evidence heard, that they were of the opinion that when the side of a road was not strong, roof bars should not merely be wedged against the side, but should be supported from below."

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"Dunfermline Press"
22 May, 1926

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of George Ross, mining contractor, lately residing at 171 Stenhouse Street, Cowdenbeath, who died on 7th May in the Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital, from injuries received on 10th March in No. 10 Pit, Cowdenbeath, by being crushed between an empty hutch and a roof crown.
Those giving evidence included:- Police Constable James Wilson, Fife County Police, Dunfermline; Charles Potter, 31 Broad Street, Cowdenbeath; James Gallanders, wheeler, Stenhouse Street, Cowdenbeath; James Lilley, oncost worker, Foulford Street, Cowdenbeath; and John Alexander, colliery manager. The jury returned a formal verdict.

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"Dunfermline Press"
30 October, 1926

Water difficulties are being experienced at Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath. It is understood that, as a result of the storm at the beginning of the week, the electric current, which drives the underground pumps failed, and before it could be restored the water rose over the pumps. The water is now some distance up the shaft, and arrangements are being made to install new pumping machinery to deal with the situation.

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"Lochgelly Times"
15 June, 1927
COWDENBEATH PITS TO CLOSE

The following Cowdenbeath pits are to close down:-

          No. 10 (Kirkford)
          Lassodie Mill (Kelty)
          No. 1 (Foulford)

This intimation has been made by the Fife Coal Coy., and it has caused an uneasy feeling in the district.
Some time ago a prominent official of the Fife Coal Coy., indicated to us the prospect of such a happening. Indeed, he expressed the opinion that the present condition of the mining industry was such that until new plans could be put into operation there would be a certain closing down of all the older pits, not only in Fife, but all over the country. New methods were needed, and only in the newer types of pits could these be applied. Something like 400 men are involved in the present closing down, and we were informed that as far as possible they would be absorbed in other pits. ...

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"The Times"
10 August, 1927

The Kirkford Institute is to be closed down from today (Friday) for an indefinite period. ... This action has been forced because of the refusal of the District Welfare Committee to maintain the Institute during the summer months, and also because of the closing down recently of No. 10 Pit, which was the main source of income. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 June, 1931

David Galloway (29), who resided at Black Road, Kelty, was killed on Wednesday forenoon when he came in contact with a live electric wire. He was employed as a transmission linesman with the Fife Coal Company, Limited, and, at the time of the accident he was examining an overhead cable leading to Kirkford Colliery. He was thrown to the ground, a distance of about 40 feet. Deceased leaves a widow and one child.

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"Dunfermline Press"
13 June, 1931

Under the Fatal Accidents Inquiry Act, an inquiry was held in the Sheriff Court, Dunfermline, on Thursday - before Sheriff Umpherston and a Jury - into the circumstances attending the death of David Cook Galloway, electric linesman, Hutton's Buildings, Black Road, Kelty, who was killed on 3rd June at No. 10 Colliery, Kirkford, of the Fife Coal Company, Limited, by electric shock from one of the transmission lines, in course of his employment as a transmission linesman. Those giving evidence included:- George Adams (42), foreman electrical linesman; William Rennie, Keltyhill Road, Kelty; and William Finney. A formal verdict was returned.

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"Dunfermline Press"
15 August, 1936
MINING DEVELOPMENT AT COWDENBEATH.
CENTRALISATION OF THREE COLLIERIES.

A Dunfermline Press representative learned yesterday of an important mining development which is to take place at the Fife Coal Company's No. 7 Pit, Mossbeath and Kirkford Collieries, Cowdenbeath. A mine is being driven from No. 7 Pit to Mossbeath, and this will connect both collieries with Kirkford. It is expected that a new screening plant will be erected at No. 7 Pit, and the output of the three pits will be centralised there. The men employed at present in the different collieries will be taken underground at Kirkford.

PROPOSED PIT BATHS.

A campaign to persuade the Central Miners' Welfare Committee, London, to provide the wherewithal for the provision of pithead baths at the Fife Coal Co.'s No. 7 Colliery, Cowdenbeath, is about to be embarked upon.
The suggestion arose at a meeting of the Colliery's Safety Committee on Thursday evening, when it was agreed that in view of the working changes which are to take place at the pit, every effort should be made to organise the men with a view to having baths erected at the pithead. ... Another consideration which the authorities may take into account is the life of No. 7 Pit, from which it is believed, coal will be worked for the next half century.

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"Dunfermline Press"
29 June, 1940
COWDENBEATH SHAFTSMAN FALLS DOWN PIT SHAFT.

George Guthrie, Wilson Street, Cowdenbeath, shaftsman at No. 1 Lumphinnans Colliery, was seriously injured when he fell down the pit shaft at No. 10 Colliery, Kirkford, on Tuesday night. He was engaged in salvage work in the pit shaft when the accident occurred. Safety precautions had been taken, but when he was sawing through an old wooden pump beam the beam swung awkwardly, and, in trying to get clear of it, he lost his balance and fell from his platform. The shaft was over 100 feet deep, but he managed to grasp a ledge 30 feet down and cling to it until he was rescued.
In his fall he fractured one of his ankles and received spinal injuries. He also suffered from shock. He was removed to Dunfermline and West Fife Hospital. Guthrie is well-known as a chess player, and was formerly a keen golfer.

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"Dunfermline Press"
6 May, 1944
FORMER FOOTBALL OFFICIAL'S DEATH

A well-known football official has passed away in the person of Mr William Archibald (70), who resided at 48 Arthur Place, Cowdenbeath. On Monday afternoon he was standing at the bottom of the shaft at Kirkford pit when he suddenly collapsed and died immediately. He leaves a widow and a large grown-up family. Archibald for many years was closely associated with Hearts of Beath when a senior club, and was a close friend of Alexander Paterson, of Dunfermline F. C. He then became connected with the Fife Junior Association and officiated as a referee. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
26 February, 1949
ALUMINIUM PITHEAD BATHS

Aluminium pithead baths, the first of their kind in Scotland, will be brought into commission at Kirkford Pit, Cowdenbeath, on Monday. The baths, which are designed for collieries with a short life, have been erected and fitted within a period of six months. Provision is made for 300 miners, and the building will incorporate all the facilities associated with the more permanent erections. There are twenty showers, and a specially heated section will dry and air the pit clothes.

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"Dunfermline Press"
12 December, 1953
Cowdenbeath Pit Fatality

George Kellichan, 3 West Lane, Cowdenbeath, was instantaneously killed by a fall of stone from the waste in the main coal section of No. 10 Kirkford Pit on Wednesday evening. Deceased is survived by his wife and family of three young children.

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"Dunfermline Press"
30 January, 1954

... Formal verdicts were returned in the cases of John Hutchison (41), colliery electrician, 8 Montrose Crescent, Lochore, who died on 5th November 1953 underground in Mary Colliery from multiple injuries sustained in the course of his work when there was a seizure of the rotor shaft of an electrical motor and its housing, whereby the housing revolved and struck him; and of George Kellichan (33), miner, 3 West Lane, Cowdenbeath, who died on 9th December in the underground workings of No. 10 Colliery, Kirkford, Cowdenbeath, from multiple injuries to his head, a fractured skull, and asphyxiation, sustained in the course of his occupation, when he was struck by a large stone which fell from the roof.

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"Dunfermline Press"
15 October, 1960
Shotfiring Contest

The 12th annual shotfiring competition organised by the West Fife Area of the N.C.B. was staged at Kirkford No. 10 Colliery, Cowdenbeath, last Friday. The tests were carried out under realistic conditions in the building formerly used as pithead baths at the colliery. This has been converted into a demonstration hall for the future staging of ambulance, mines rescue, Civil Defence, and other competitions associated with the industry.
Eight competitors from the various groups who had survived the eliminating contests took part and competition was very keen.
The winner was Daniel Barr, 97 Paul Street, Lochgelly, an employee of the Nellie Colliery. With 136 points he finished one point ahead of Hugh McFarlane, 12 Denfield Gardens, Cardenden, who represented Dundonald Colliery. Third place was taken by Blairhall Colliery qualifier, James McCaffery, of 5 Wilson Street, Blairhall, with 120 points. The adjudicators were Mr D. Richards and Mr R. A. Bowen, H. M. Inspector of Mines.
The presentation of prizes took place in the No. 1 Lecture Hall, which has been transferred from Mossbeath Training Centre and resited in the colliery grounds at Kirkford. ...

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"Dunfermline Press"
11 March, 1961
Accident Tests At Colliery

Teams wearing breathing apparatus and operating by means of flashing signal lights take part today (Saturday) in a realistically staged underground accident test at Kirkford No. 10 Colliery. The test is the set piece in the fifth annual competition of the Cowdenbeath Central Rescue Station.
Twelve teams are competing - four from the west and five from the east sections of the new Fife Area of the N.C.B., and three from the Valleyfield group of collieries administered by the Alloa Area.
The competition started at 8 o'clock this morning, and the public will be admitted to this dramatically staged and exceedingly interesting contest from 10 o'clock.
The results should be known shortly before noon.

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"Dunfermline Press"
18 March, 1961
Prizes For Mine Rescue Teams

The fifth annual mine rescue competition of the Cowdenbeath Central Rescue Station took place at Kirkford Colliery on Saturday. Twelve teams from various collieries in Fife took part, and there was keen competition. When the adjudicator's awards were announced, it was found that only one point separated the first two teams.
Mr J. McClelland, Safety Engineer, intimated the results to a large audience as follows:- 1 Michael Colliery (W. Shaw (capt.), G. Burt, G. Moreland, A. Smith, J. Younger, D. Doel (reserve), 122½ points; 2 Bowhill Group (Andrew McCormack (capt.), Robert Wilson, George Bremner, Duncan McLean (reserve)), 121½ points. The adjudicators were Mr Lusk, superintendent of Heriot-Watt Rescue Station, and Mr R. A. Bower, H.M. Inspector of Mines, assisted by Mr R. Bottomley.
They also awarded individual prizes for the best performances by newcomers to rescue competitions. The recipients were Robert Hutchison, Thomas Campbell, and Michael Kirk, of Comrie No. 2; Archie Spence and William Kennedy, of Seafield Colliery.
Mr R. B. Dunn, production manager for the west section of Fife Area presided at the presentation of prizes, which was made by Mr T. D. M. Scrimgeour, Fife Area general manager. Votes of thanks were proposed by Mr J. S. Wilson, depute Area production manager (ops.) for the east section of Fife.

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"Dunfermline Press"
9 February, 1963
Ambulance Contest

At Kirkford Colliery an ambulance contest was held with seven teams taking part. Results were:- 1 Kinglassie Colliery, 485 points; 2 Frances Colliery "B", 470 points; 3 Lumphinnans No. 11 Colliery, 431 points.
The individual prizes were won as follows:- No. 1 - J. Eadie, Kinglassie; No. 2 - D. Morgan, Frances; No. 3 - J. Raeburn, Dundonald; No. 4 - J. Simpson, Kinglassie. The first three teams go forward to the Fife finals.

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"Dunfermline Press"
16 February, 1963
Fifty Years In Coal Industry

Mr William Duncan, 57 Greenbank Drive, Cowdenbeath, retires at the end of the month after fifty years' service in the mining industry. For 38 years of his service he was employed as a deputy in No. 7 Pit, and for the last three years he has acted as pumper-deputy at Kirkford.
Mr Duncan, who has seen the development from the old pick and shovel method of mining to the present machine era states, "Of the two the old style of working was much happier, though more arduous. I have no regrets and if I had to do it all over again I would have no qualms."
A native of Lochgelly, Mr Duncan began his mining career in the Wee Mary, Lochgelly, in 1913.

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"Dunfermline Press"
16 March, 1963
Mine Rescue Awards

Eleven teams from the Fife and Alloa Areas of the Coal Board took part in the annual rescue competition of the Cowdenbeath Rescue Station at Kirkford on Saturday. The results were:- 1 Wellesley Colliery, 143½ points; 2 Seafield Colliery, 133½ points; 3 Bowhill Group No. 2 (James Simpson, P. Barker, Pat Reilly, Andrew Dewar and Robert Wilson), 127 points.
Individual prize winners:- A. Spence (Wellesley), T. Mould and W. Kerr (Comrie), J. Moyes and A. Younger (Michael Colliery).

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